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Answers for “The Development of Museums” with explanations

Question 27-30:
27. ii (para B, first 3 lines: ―Recently, however, attitudes towards history and the way it
should be presented have altered. The key word in heritage display is now ‘experience‘
the more exciting the better and, if possible, involving all the senses. Good examples of
this approach‖)

28. vi (para C, first 2 lines: ―In a related development, the sharp distinction between museum
and heritage sites on the one hand, and theme parks on the other, is gradually evaporating.
They already‖)

29. i (para D, line 2-5: ―social and cultural issues, and move away from fantasy. This
development is a response to market forces and, although museums and heritage sites
have a special, rather distinct, role to fulfil, they are also operating in a very competitive
environment, where visitors make choices on how and where to spend their free time.
Heritage and‖)

30. iii (para E, first 2 lines: ―It could be claimed that in order to make everything in heritage
more ‗real‘, historical accuracy must be increasingly altered. For example,
Pithecanthropus erectus‖)

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Question 31-36:
31. B (para A, line 6-9: ―museum displays. Museums used to look — and some still do –
much like storage rooms of objects packed together in showcases: good for scholars who
wanted to study the subtle differences in design, but not for the ordinary visitor, to whom
it all looked alike. Similarly, the information accompanying the objects often made
little‖)

32. A (para B, line 2-3: ―have altered. The key word in heritage display is now ‘experience‘
the more exciting the better and, if possible, involving all the senses. Good examples of
this approach‖)

33. D (para C, first 2 lines: ―In a related development, the sharp distinction between museum
and heritage sites on the one hand, and theme parks on the other, is gradually evaporating.
They already‖)

34. D (para D, line 7-8: ―to attract their visitors: their assets are already in place. However,
exhibits must be both based on artefacts and facts as we know them, and attractively
presented. Those‖)

35. C (para E, line 4-7: ―corresponds to public perceptions. Similarly, in the Museum of
Natural History in Washington, Neanderthal man is shown making a dominant gesture to
his wife. Such presentations tell us more about contemporary perceptions of the world
than about our ancestors. There is one compensation, however, for the professionals who
make‖)

36. B (para F, first 3 lines: ―Human bias is inevitable, but another source of bias in the
representation of history has to do with the transitory nature of the materials themselves.
The simple fact is that not everything from history survives the historical process. Castles,
palaces and‖)

Question 37 – 40:

37. FALSE (para D, first 3 lines: ―Theme parks are undergoing other changes, too, as they try
to present more serious social and cultural issues, and move away from fantasy. This
development is a response to market forces and, although museums and heritage sites
have a special‖)

38. NOT GIVEN

39. FALSE (para F, line 5-7: ―applies to the furnishings and other contents of the premises.
In a town like Leyden in Holland, which in the seventeenth century was occupied by
approximately the same number of inhabitants as today, people lived within the walled
town, an area more‖)

40. TRUE (para F, line 9-10: ―lived together in circumstances beyond our imagination. Yet
in museums, fine period rooms give only an image of the lifestyle of the upper class of
that era. No wonder‖)

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