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Answers for “The Impact of Wilderness Tourism” with explanations

Answers for “The effects of light on plant and animals species” with explanations

Answers for “Flawed Beauty” with explanations

Question 1-3:
1. iii (para 1, first 3 lines: ―The market for tourism in remote areas is booming as never
before. Countries all across the world are actively promoting their ‗wilderness’ regions —
such as mountains, Arctic lands, deserts, small islands and wetlands — to high-spending‖
para 3, first 3 lines: ―Tourists are drawn to these regions by their natural landscape
beauty and the unique cultures of their indigenous people. And poor governments in these
isolated areas have welcomed the new breed of ‗adventure tourist’, grateful for‖)

2. v (para 1, first 2 lines: ―Once a location is established as a main tourist destination, the
effects on the local community are profound. When hill-farmers, for example, can make
more money‖
para 2, line 3-5: ―However. as some inhabitants become involved in tourism, they no
longer have time to collect wild food; this has led to increasing dependence on bought
food and stores. Tourism is not always the culprit behind such changes. All kinds of‖)

3. ii (para 1, last 4 lines: ―can be minimized. Indeed, it can even be a vehicle for
reinvigorating local cultures, as has happened with the Sherpas of Nepal’s Khumbu
Valley and in some Alpine villages. And a growing number of adventure tourism
operators are trying to ensure that their activities benefit the local population and
environment over the long term‖
(para 3: ―Native people in the desert regions of the American Southwest have
followed similar strategies, encouraging tourists to visit their pueblos and reservations to
purchase high-quality handicrafts and artwork. The Acoma and San Ildefonso pueblos
have established highly profitable pottery businesses, while the Navajo and Hopi groups
have been similarly successful with jewellery.‖)

Question 4-9:
4. YES (part A, para 1, line 4-5: ―tourists. The attraction of these areas is obvious: by
definition, wilderness tourism requires little or no initial investment. But that does not
mean that there is no cost‖)

5. YES (part A, para 1, line 6-8: ―As the I992 United Nations Conference on Environment
and Development recognized, these regions are fragile (i.e highly vulnerable to abnormal
pressures) not just in terms of their ecology, but also in terms of the culture of their
inhabitants‖)

6. NO (part A, para 1, line 11-12: ―Arctic areas. An important characteristic is their marked
seasonality, with harsh conditions prevailing for many months each year. Consequently,
most human‖)

7. YES (part B, para 1, line 5-6: ―farm-work, which is thus left to other members of the
family. In some hill-regions. this has led to a serious decline in farm output and a change
in the local diet‖)

8. NO (part B, para 2, first 2 lines: ―In Arctic and desert societies, year-round survival has
traditionally depended on hunting animals and fish and collecting Fruit over a relatively
short season.‖)

9. NOT GIVEN

Question 10-13:
10. ‗cheese‘ (part C, para 2, line 3-5: ―the rising number of second home developments In
the Swiss Pays d‘Enhaut resulted in limits being imposed on their growth. There has also
been a renaissance in communal cheese production in the area. providing the locals with
11. ‗tour/tourist/tourism‘ (part C, para 3, line 3-4: ―their home base. But some Arctic
communities are now operating tour businesses themselves, thereby ensuring that the
benefits accrue locally. For instance, a native‖)

12. ‗pottery‘ (part C, para 4, last 3 lines: ―purchase high-quality handicrafts and artwork. The
Acoma and San Ildefonso pueblos have established highly profitable pottery businesses.
while the Navajo‖)

13. ‗jewellery‘ (part C, para 4, last 2 lines: ―pueblos have established highly profitable
pottery businesses. while the Navajo and Hopi groups have been similarly successful
with jewellery‖)

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