Phrasal Verb G

  • gad about|Visit a lot of different places for pleasure|I spent the afternoon GADDING ABOUT in the West End.|_
  • gad around|Visit different places for pleasure|I spent the afternoon GADDING AROUND looking for some books.|_
  • gag for|Want something a lot|I’m GAGGING FOR a drink.|_
  • gang up|Form a group against something or someone|They GANGED UP to try to stop the new system.|1
  • gang up against|Harass, bully (in a group)|They GANGED UP AGAINST me because I wouldn’t accept their ideas.|_
  • gang up on|Harass, bully|They GANGED UP ON him because of the way he spoke.|_
  • gear to|Organise or arrange something for a particular purpose, audience, etc. (Often passive)|It’s not GEARED TO non-specialists.|_
  • gear towards|Organise or arrange something for a particular purpose, audience, etc|The project is GEARED TOWARDS older people.|_
  • gear up|Get ready for a busy period|The shops are GEARING UP for the New Year sales.|1
  • gee up|Used to encourage a horse, and sometimes people, to go faster|Her horse was slow so she told it to GEE UP.|_
  • geek out|Talk at length about computing|Henry always GEEKS OUT at parties and bores all the people who don’t know much about computers.|_
  • get about|Visit many places|I GET ABOUT a lot with my job- last years I visited eleven countries.|1
  • get above|Behave as if you are better or more important than others|She’s been GETTING ABOVE HERSELF since she got promoted. (This is normally used in progressive forms and followed by a reflexive pronoun, though ‘get above your station’ is also used.)|_
  • get across|Communicate successfully|I just couldn’t GET my message ACROSS at the meeting.|1
  • get across to|Be convincing or make a good impression|How can I GET ACROSS TO my audience?|_
  • get after|Nag or exhort someone|You should GET AFTER them to finish the work.|_
  • get ahead|Progress|Nowadays, you need IT skills if you want to GET AHEAD.|1
  • get ahead of|Move in front of|I work at home in the evening to GET AHEAD OF schedule.|_
  • get along|Have a good relationship|Why don’t you two GET ALONG? You’re always arguing.|1
  • get along in|Progress|How are you GETTING ALONG IN the company.|_
  • get along with|Have a good relationship with someone|I don’t GET ALONG WITH my sister- we have nothing in common.|1
  • get around|Become known|It didn’t take long for the news to GET AROUND once it got into the newspapers.|1
  • get around to|Finally manage to do something, make the effort to do something|It always takes me ages to GET AROUND to replying to letters.|1
  • get at|Criticise|His boss is always GETTING AT him for arriving late.|1
  • get away|Escape|The robbers GOT AWAY in a stolen car, which the police later found abandoned.|1
  • get away from|Go somewhere different or do something different|Work’s getting on top of me; I need to GET AWAY FROM it.|_
  • get away with|Not get caught, criticised or punished for doing something wrong|Thieves GOT AWAY WITH two Picassos, which were never found.|_
  • get away!|Escape|The robbers GOT AWAY in a stolen car, which the police later found abandoned.|_
  • get back|Return|The train was held up so we didn’t GET BACK home until midnight.|1
  • get back at|Take revenge|I’ll GET BACK AT her for landing me in trouble.|_
  • get back into|Start doing something after stopping for some time|I am GETTING BACK INTO my Khmer lessons after the summer break.|_
  • get back to|Respond to a contact|I’ll GET BACK TO you as soon as I hear any news.|_
  • get back together|Restart a relationship|We split up a few months ago but GOT BACK TOGETHER last week.|_
  • get behind|Support|All the students GOT BEHIND the teacher.|1
  • get behind with|Be late paying instalments for something.|If you GET BEHIND WITH mortgage payments, you might lose your home.|_
  • get by|Have just enough money to live on|They’re finding it increasingly difficult to GET BY since their daughter was born.|1
  • get by on|Manage on a certain amount of money|It’s hard to GET BY ON my salary.|_
  • get by with|Have enough of something to do the job|We should be able to GET BY WITH three PCs, but four would be better.|_
  • get down|Make someone depressed, unhappy, exhausted, etc.|The miserable weather in winter really GETS me DOWN.|1
  • get down on|Criticise|My mother used to GET DOWN ON us for not doing enough homework.|_
  • get down to|Start working seriously|I find it extremely difficult to GET DOWN TO doing any revision for examinations.|_
  • get in|Arrange for someone to do a job in your home, workplace, etc|The air conditioning has broken down; we’ll have to GET a technician IN to fix it.|1
  • get in on|Become involved|The company tried to GET IN ON our market.|_
  • get in with|Become friendly with, ingratiate with|I tried to GET IN WITH them as I thought it would help me at work.|_
  • get into|Become involved or interested|She’s been GETTING INTO dance music recently.|1
  • get it|Be punished or scolded|If you don’t stop that right now, you’ll really GET IT!|1
  • get it off|Have sex|They GOT IT OFF at the party.|_
  • get it off with|Have sex with|She GOT IT OFF WITH her friend’s husband.|_
  • get it on|Become interested or excited|The talk was dull and nobody GOT IT ON.|1
  • get it on with|Have sex with|Did you GET IT ON WITH him?|_
  • get it together|Control things in your life to achieve your aims|If I don’t GET IT TOGETHER, I will never reach my targets.|_
  • get it up|Become aroused (of a man)|He couldn’t GET IT UP and felt very embarrassed.|_
  • get off|Escape punishment|He GOT OFF on a technicality and left the court a free man.|1
  • get off it|A way of expressing disbelief, or telling someone that they’re wrong or have an incorrect opinion|I knew he was lying so I told him to GET OFF IT.|_
  • get off on|Enjoy a drug|He GETS OFF ON crystal meth every night.|_
  • get off with|Have casual sex with|He GOT OFF WITH her at the party.|_
  • get off!|Escape punishment|He GOT OFF on a technicality and left the court a free man.|_
  • get on|Continue doing something|The teacher asked the pupils to GET ON with some work quietly as she had to leave the classroom.|1
  • get on at|Criticise unfairly|He’s always GETTING ON AT me when I haven’t done anything wrong.|_
  • get on for|Be near a time|It’s GETTING ON FOR midnight.|_
  • get on to|Start to suspect|It took the authorities a long time to GET ON TO the gang.|_
  • get on with|Have a good relationship|Fortunately, I GET ON WITH my boss.|1
  • get onto|Start discussing a topic|We didn’t GET ONTO the third item on the agenda.|1
  • get out|Leave the house to visit place and socialise|She doesn’t GET OUT much now she has her baby.|1
  • get out of|Avoid doing something you dislike|I said I wasn’t feeling well and GOT OUT OF the extra work.|_
  • get out!|Leave the house to visit place and socialise|She doesn’t GET OUT much now she has her baby.|_
  • get over|Recover from something, feel better|It took me ages to GET OVER the bout of flu.|1
  • get over with|Do something unpleasant that has to be done rather than delaying it any more|I GOT the test OVER WITH rather than have to worry about it any longer.|_
  • get round|Become known|I don’t want this to GET ROUND, so please keep it to yourself.|_
  • get round (around) to|Finally manage to do something|It always takes me ages to GET ROUND to writing letters. (In American English ‘around’ is used)|_
  • get round (or around)|Persuade someone|She didn’t want to let me do it, but I succeeded in GETTING ROUND her. (In American English ‘around’ is used)|_
  • get through|Contact|I tried calling her mobile phone, but I couldn’t GET THROUGH.|1
  • get through to|Make someone understand|I explained it carefully, but I just couldn’t GET THROUGH TO him.|_
  • get to|Annoy, irritate|Don’t let her GET TO you; she’s just in a bad mood.|1
  • get together|Meet socially|We GOT TOGETHER in the pub for a drink.|1
  • get up|Get out of bed|I GET UP at seven o’clock on weekdays, but lie in till noon at the weekend.|1
  • get up to|Do something wrong or naughty|The children are always GETTING UP TO some trouble or other.|_
  • ghost away|Remove someone secretly of discreetly|They GHOSTED him AWAY to a secret location before he could be arrested.|_
  • gin up|Boost, increase or exaggerate|The candidates tried to GIN UP support at the straw poll by transporting their supporters for free.|_
  • ginger up|Make more lively|They tried to GINGER UP the party to stop people leaving.|1
  • give away|Entrust your daughter to her husband through the marriage ceremony|He GAVE his daughter AWAY and told the groom to look after her.|1
  • give back|Return something you’ve borrowed|I GAVE the money BACK that she’d lent to me.|1
  • give in|Stop doing something because it’s too hard or requires too much energy|I couldn’t finish the crossword puzzle and had to GIVE IN and look at the answers.|1
  • give in to|Agree to something you don’t like|The government says it will not GIVE IN TO terrorists.|_
  • give it to|Criticise harshly or punish someone for something|They really GAVE IT TO me for forgetting to turn up.|_
  • give it up for|Applaud|Please GIVE IT UP FOR our next guest.|_
  • give it up to|Applaud|Please GIVE IT UP TO our next guest.|_
  • give of|Contribute without expecting anything in return, usually time or money|He GIVE OF his free time to help the club.|_
  • give off|Emit pollution or something else unpleasant|The police stopped the van because it was GIVING OFF a lot of black smoke.|1
  • give onto|Open into a place, for a door or window|The French windows GIVE ONTO the lawn.|_
  • give out|Distribute|Somebody was GIVING leaflets OUT in front of the underground station.|1
  • give out to|Scold, tell off, nag|The teacher GAVE OUT TO us for being late.|_
  • give over|Stop doing something bad or annoying|They were making a lot of noise so I told them to GIVE OVER.|_
  • give over to|Dedicate, devote|He GAVE himself OVER TO finding his son.|_
  • give over!|Stop doing something bad or annoying|They were making a lot of noise so I told them to GIVE OVER.|_
  • give up|Stop doing something that has been a habit|I GAVE UP taking sugar in tea and coffee to lose weight.|1
  • give up on|Lose faith in or stop believing in something or someone|I GAVE UP ON them when I heard what they were saying about me behind my back.|_
  • give up to|Denounce, report to authorities|He GAVE his accomplices UP TO the police.|_
  • give way|Stop to allow vehicles to pass|You must GIVE WAY at this junction.|1
  • give way to|Yield, surrender, retreat|Don’t GIVE WAY TO your worst fears about this.|_
  • give yourself up|Surrender to the police or authorities|The gang GAVE THEMSELVES UP last night.|_
  • give yourself up to|Dedicate time, energy, etc, to something|He GAVE himself UP TO his job.|_
  • gloss over|Try to minimise the importance of something|The Minister tried to GLOSS OVER the report that was critical of her department.|1
  • gnaw at|Trouble, worry or annoy someone|I know it was wrong and guilt has GNAWED AT me ever since I did it.|1
  • gnaw away at|Harm gradually|Their behaviour GNAWED AWAY AT our trust in them.|_
  • go about|Deal with something|How should I GO ABOUT telling her the bad news?|1
  • go across|Move to another side or place|He WENT ACROSS to the opposition.|_
  • go after|Chase, try to get|The cat WENT AFTER the pigeon, but it flew away.|1
  • go against|Lose a decision or a verdict of a court|If the decision GOES AGAINST me, I’ll go bankrupt.|1
  • go ahead|Proceed|The construction of the bypass WENT AHEAD despite the protests from environmentalists.|1
  • go ahead with|Proceed|We now intend to GO AHEAD WITH the final stage of the project.|_
  • go along with|Accept a decision or suggestion|I didn’t really agree, but I WENT ALONG WITH the decision because I was in the minority.|_
  • go around|Circulate|A rumour is GOING AROUND about the Attorney General.|1
  • go at|Attack or approach something with vigour|She WENT AT her dinner like she hadn’t eaten for days.|_
  • go away|Leave a place or disappear|This drug should make the pain GO AWAY.|1
  • go back|Have a long history|He and I GO BACK a long way- we were at school together.|1
  • go back on|Break a promise|The government have GONE BACK ON their promise not to raise taxes.|1
  • go before|Precede|We canĀ“t ignore what has GONE BEFORE and pretend that everything has been OK.|_
  • go below|Leave the top deck of a ship|The captain told the passengers to GO BELOW when the storm started.|_
  • go by|The passing of time|Ten years WENT BY before we saw each other again.|1
  • go down|Decrease, get smaller|The price of scanners has GONE DOWN recently.|1
  • go down on|Perform oral sex|He WENT DOWN ON her.|1
  • go down to|Be defeated|Chelsea WENT DOWN TO Arsenal in a thrilling game.|_
  • go down with|Fall ill|She WENT DOWN WITH a virus.|_
  • go for|Attack|The neighbour’s dog WENT FOR the postman and bit him.|1
  • go for it|Be assertive and ready to initiate action. (Related to the meaning ‘attack’)|He was not always successful, but whatever he tried to do he would always GO FOR IT.|_
  • go forth|Leave a place|He WENT FORTH and found a wife in another city.|1
  • go forward|Move clocks ahead|The clocks MOVE FORWARD an hour on Sunday.|1
  • go in|Go to hospital for treatment, surgery, etc.|He WENT IN for a triple bypass operation two days ago.|1
  • go in for|Enter a competition or sit an exam|He WENT IN FOR the photography prize, but didn’t win.|_
  • go in with|Form a union or alliance|They’re going to GO IN WITH the Social Democrats.|_
  • go into|Discuss in some detail|They refused to GO INTO exactly what was wrong.|1
  • go it|Behave in a reckless way|Shouting at the boss like that is GOING IT.|_
  • go it alone|Do something without help|He prefers to GO IT ALONE rather then working with the team.|_
  • go off|Explode (bomb), start ringing (alarm)|The fire alarm WENT OFF because someone was smoking in the toilets.|1
  • go off with|Elope, run away with someone|She WENT OFF WITH her friend’s husband.|_
  • go on|Continue|He WENT ON and ON talking and I was so bored.|1
  • go on about|Talk too much|He’s always GOING ON ABOUT his kids.|_
  • go on at|Pester, try to make someone do something by repeatedly asking or suggesting|He WENT ON AT his parents until they bought him the game.|_
  • go on to|Proceed|We had dinner and WENT ON TO a few bars.|_
  • go on with|Continue doing|Please GO ON WITH your work.|_
  • go one|A way of encouraging someone|GO ON, apply for the job.|_
  • go out|Stop burning, be extinguished|The candle WENT OUT and left us in darkness.|1
  • go out for|Become a candidate, apply for something|She WENT OUT FOR a place on the team.|_
  • go out to|Feel sympathy with someone|Our condolences GO OUT TO all the families who have lost people in this tragic accident.|_
  • go out with|Have a relationship with|He’s been GOING OUT WITH his girlfriend for around six months now.|_
  • go over|Look at something, revise|We WENT OVER our notes before the exam.|1
  • go over to|Go on a journey|I’m GOING OVER TO Hong Kong next month.|_
  • go past|Pass without stopping|She WENT PAST me without saying hello.|1
  • go round|Be or have enough of something|There aren’t enough jobs to GO ROUND for the numbers of people graduating nowadays.|_
  • go through|Experience|You wouldn’t believe what I WENT THROUGH when I was ill!|1
  • go through with|Do or complete something you’ve agreed to|He did promise, but I doubt that he’ll GO THROUGH WITH it.|_
  • go to|Allocate money|About half of my income GOES TO pay the mortgage.|1
  • go together|Harmonize or be compatible|Drinking and driving don’t GO TOGETHER.|_
  • go towards|Contibute|The money WENT TOWARDS my university fees.|_
  • go under|Go bankrupt|Many small shops are GOING UNDER because they cannot compete with the supermarkets.|1
  • go up|Rise or climb|The price of petrol has GONE UP sharply because of the increase in duty in the Government’s budget.|1
  • go up to|Approach|She WENT UP TO him and asked him if he wanted a drink.|_
  • go with|Combine nicely|Does this tie GO WITH my shirt?|1
  • go without|Not have|I had to GO WITHOUT lunch today because I didn’t have any time.|_
  • goof around|Fool around, not be serious|We spent the weekend GOOFING AROUND.|_
  • goof off|Avoid or leave work|We GOOFED OFF for the afternoon to watch the match.|_
  • goof on|Tease, make fun of|I don’t like the way they’re always GOOFING ON me.|_
  • goof up|Mess, spoil|They GOOFED UP our plans.|_
  • grasp at|Try to take hold of something quickly|He GRASPED AT the rail when he fell.|_
  • grass on|Report someone to a person in authority|He GRASSED ON us and got us into a lot of trouble.|_
  • grass up|Report someone to a person in authority|She didn’t to GRASS them UP, even though they’d been bullying her badly.|_
  • grey out|Disable a function in a computer program, leaving it visible but not working|They GREYED OUT the print button to stop people using it. (In American English, ‘gray’ would be used.)|_
  • grind away|Keep working at something|Although I hated it, I GROUND AWAY until I had finished.|1
  • grind down|Reduce or destroy someone’s enthusiasm|Their negativity GRINDS me DOWN|1
  • grind into|Press or twist something hard into something else|She GROUND her cigarette INTO the ashtray.|_
  • grind on|Proceed relentlessly|The war GROUND ON for years.|_
  • grind out|Produce something with great difficulty|I find it very hard to GRIND OUT an original essay every week.|1
  • grind up|Reduce to small pieces|She GROUND the beans UP and made some coffee.|_
  • grow apart|Become distant, stop having a close relationship because time, distance, interests, etc, have changed|We used to be good friends at school but have since GROWN APART.|_
  • grow away from|Become less friendly with|I have GROWN AWAY FROM many of the people I grew up with.|_
  • grow back|Grow again|Nails GROW BACK quickly after you cut them.|_
  • grow from|Result from a process|A lot GREW FROM the peace talks.|_
  • grow into|Grow to fit large clothes|The jacket’s a bit big, but she’ll GROW INTO it.|_
  • grow on|Like something that you didn’t like at first|The painting has GROWN ON me; I used to ate it.|_
  • grow out|Let hair, etc, with dyes, perms grow to get rid of the style|I’m letting the perm GROW OUT.|_
  • grow out of|Grow too large for clothes|He GREW OUT OF those shoes in no time at all.|_
  • grow to|Eventually do something|We GREW TO like the neighbourhood.|_
  • grow together|Gradually become attached, united or close|We GREW TOGETHER while we were working on the same project.|_
  • grow up|Mature, become adult|He GREW UP in the West Country.|1
  • grow up on|Do or have something when you are a child|We GREW UP ON cartoons.|_
  • grow upon|Like something that you didn’t like at first|The book started slowly and was a bit dull, but it has GROWN UPON me.|_
  • gun for|Try to destroy an opponent|He’s GUNNING FOR his rivals at work.|_
  • gussy up|Dress smartly or improve the appearance of something|They spent a fortune GUSSYING UP the house.|1

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