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IELTS Academic Reading: Cambridge 4 Test 2 Reading passage 3; PLAY IS A SERIOUS BUSINESS; with best solutions and best explanations

This Academic IELTS Reading post focuses on solutions to IELTS Cambridge 4 Reading Test 2 Reading Passage 3 titledPLAY IS A SERIOUS BUSINESS’. This is a targeted post for IELTS candidates who have big problems finding out and understanding Reading Answers in the AC module. This post can guide you the best to understand every Reading answer without much trouble. Finding out IELTS Reading answers is a steady process, and this post will assist you in this respect.

IELTS Cambridge 4 Test 1: AC Reading Module

Reading Passage 3: Questions 27-40

The headline of the passage: PLAY IS A SERIOUS BUSINESS

Questions 27-32: Identifying information

[This question asks you to find information from the passage and write the number of the paragraph (A, B, C or D … .. ) in the answer sheet. Now, if the question is given in the very first part of the question set, I’d request you not to answer them. It’s mainly because this question will not follow any sequence, and so it will surely kill your time. Rather, you should answer all the other questions first. And just like List of Headings, only read the first two lines or last two lines of the expected paragraph initially. If you find the answers, you need not read the middle part. If you don’t find answers yet, you can skim the middle part of the paragraph. Keywords will be a useful matter here.]

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Question no. 27: the way play causes unusual connections in the brain which are beneficial

Keywords for the question: the way, play causes, unusual connections, brain, beneficial,   

Paragraph H talks about the unusual connection. Here, in lines 6-10, the author of the text says, “ . .. . Siviy studied how bouts of play affected the brain’s levels of a particular chemical associated with the stimulation and growth of nerve cells. He was surprised by the extent of the activation. ‘Play just lights everything up,’ he says. By allowing link-ups between brain areas that might not normally communicate with each other, play may enhance creativity.”

Here, might not normally communicate with each other = unusual connections,

So, the answer is: H

Question no. 28: insights from recording how much time young animals spend playing

Keywords for the question: insights, recording, how much time, young animals spend, playing,  

Take a close look at the first lines of paragraph F. “According to Byers, the timing of the playful stage in young animals provides an important clue to what’s going on. . . …”

Here, timing of the playful stage in young animals = recording how much time young animals spend playing,

And then, in the next few lines, the author provides insights on the matter.

So, the answer is: F

Question no. 29: a description of the physical hazards that can accompany play

Keywords for the question: description, physical hazards, can accompany, play,    

In lines 4-7 of paragraph A, the author says, “ . .. . For a start, play can even cost animals their lives. Eighty per cent of deaths among juvenile fur seals occur because playing pups fail to spot predators approaching. It is also extremely expensive in terms of energy. Playful young animals use around two or three per cent of their energy cavorting, and in children that figure can be closer to fifteen per cent.

Here, cost animals their lives = physical hazards, extremely expensive in terms of energy = physical hazards,

So, the answer is: A

Question no. 30: a description of the mental activities which are exercised and developed during play

Keywords for the question: description, mental activities, exercised, developed, during play,

The answer can again be found in paragraph H. The author of the text says in lines 1-2, “Not only is more of the brain involved in play than was suspected, but it also seems to activate higher cognitive processes. ‘There’s enormous cognitive involvement in play,’ says Bekoff. .. .. .”

Here, more of the brain involved & activate higher cognitive processes = description of the mental activities, in play = exercised and developed during play,

Then, there’s a description of the mental activities that happens during play.

So, the answer is: H

Question no. 31: the possible effects that a reduction in play opportunities will have on humans

Keywords for the question: possible effects, reduction, play opportunities, will have, on humans,  

The final lines in paragraph F say, “ . . . With schooling beginning earlier and becoming increasingly exam-orientated, play is likely to get even less of a look-in. Who knows what the result of that will be?”

Here, schooling beginning earlier and becoming increasingly exam-orientated = reduction in play opportunities,  

So, the answer is: I

Question no. 32: the classes of animals for which play is important

Keywords for the question: classes of animals, for which, play, important,

Let’s read paragraph B. Here, lines 3-4 mention, “ . .. .. Playfulness, it seems, is common only among mammals, although a few of the larger-brained birds also indulge. . . .”

Here, mammals & larger-brained birds = classes of animals for which play is important,

So, the answer is: B

Questions 33-35: Choosing from list of factors

[In this question type, IELTS candidates are provided with a list of factors with a question. Candidates must find out three/four or five factors that match with the questions. Most of the time, the answers can be found in one or two paragraphs.

TIPS: Both skimming and scanning are needed for this kind of question. You need to skim the passage to find out the paragraph where the answers can be found. Then you can scan it to find all the answers. The answers can be written in any order.]

Questions no. 33-35: The list below gives some ways of regarding play.

Which THREE ways are mentioned by the writer of the text? 

Keywords for the question: some ways of regarding play,

The answer can be traced in different lines of paragraph B.

First, have a close look at line no. 2, where the writer says, “ . .. The latest idea suggests that play has evolved to build big brains.. .. .”

Here, play has evolved to build big brains = an activity assisting organ growth,

Then, in lines 6-7 the writer says, “ . . .. . A popular explanation of play has been that it helps juveniles develop the skills they will need to hunt, mate and socialise as adults. .. .”

Here, helps juveniles develop the skills they will need to hunt, mate and socialise as adults = a rehearsal for later adult activities,

And finally, in lines 7-8, the writer says, “ . .. .. Another has been that it allows young animals to get in shape for adult life by improving their respiratory endurance. .. .”

 Here, allows young animals to get in shape for adult life by improving their respiratory endurance = an activity intended to build up strength for adulthood,

So, the answers are: (in any order)

A (a rehearsal for later adult activities)

C (an activity intended to build up strength for adulthood)

F (an activity assisting organ growth)

Questions 36-40: Matching statements with list of people

[In this type of question, candidates need to relate statements that are given by or link to people in the passage. The rules for finding answers to this sort of question are simple. Just find the name of the person and read around it carefully. Then, give a quick look to check whether there is another statement or idea provided by the same person in the text. If there is, check the reference carefully and decide your answer. Remember, the questions may not follow any sequential order.]

Question no. 36: Robert Barton

Keywords for the question: Robert Barton,    

In paragraph E, the writer says in lines 5-8, “ . . . .. Robert Barton of Durham University believes that, because large brains are more sensitive to developmental stimuli than smaller brains, they require more play to help mould them for adulthood. ‘I concluded it’s to do with learning, and with the importance of environmental data to the brain during development,’ he says.”

Here, environmental data to the brain during development = input concerning physical surroundings,

So, the answer is: B (Play provides input concerning physical surroundings.)

Question no. 37: Marc Bekoff

Keywords for the question: Marc Bekoff,   

At the end of paragraph G, the writer says, “ . .. Bekoff likens it to a behavioural kaleidoscope, with animals at play jumping rapidly between activities. ‘They use behaviour from a lot of different contexts – predation, aggression, reproduction,’ he says. ‘Their developing brain is getting all sorts of stimulation.’ ”

Here, a lot of different contexts – predation, aggression, reproduction = A wide range of activities are combined,

So, the answer is: G (A wide range of activities are combined during play.)

Question no. 38: John Byers

Keywords for the question: John Byers,

The answer can be found in paragraph C. The writer says here in lines 2-5, “. . .. ‘If the function of play was to get into shape,’ says Byers, ‘the optimum time for playing would depend on when it was most advantageous for the young of a particular species to do so. But it doesn’t work like that.’ Across species, play tends to peak about halfway through the suckling stage and then decline.”

Here, play tends to peak about halfway through the suckling stage and then decline = Play is not a form of fitness training for the future,

So, the answer is: E (Play is not a form of fitness training for the future.)

Question no. 39: Sergio Pellis

Keywords for the question: Sergio Pellis,

In paragraph E, the first lines state, “Earlier this year, Sergio Pellis of Lethbridge University, Canada, reported that there is a strong positive link between brain size and playfulness among mammals in general. Comparing measurements for fifteen orders of mammal, he and his team found larger brains (for a given body size) are linked to greater playfulness. … ..”

Here, larger brains (for a given body size) are linked to greater playfulness = There is a tendency for mammals with smaller brains to play less,

So, the answer is: D (There is a tendency for mammals with smaller brains to play less.)

Question no. 40: Stephen Siviy

Keywords for the question: Stephen Siviy, 

Here, play affected the brain’s levels of a particular chemical associated with the stimulation and growth of nerve cells = There is a link between a specific substance in the brain and playing,In paragraph H, the writer of the text says in lines 6-8, “ . .. .  Siviy studied how bouts of play affected the brain’s levels of a particular chemical associated with the stimulation and growth of nerve cells. He was surprised by the extent of the activation.  .. ..”

So, the answer is: A (There is a link between a specific substance in the brain and playing.)

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 4 Test 2 Reading Passage 1

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 4 Test 2 Reading Passage 2


Source: https://www.ieltsdeal.com/ielts-academic-reading-cambridge-4-test-2-reading-passage-3-play-is-a-serious-business-with-best-solutions-and-best-explanations/

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