Unit 1: Understanding Speaking Test
Unit 3: Focus on Fluency & Coherence
Unit 3: Focus on Pronunciation
Unit 6: Focus on Lexical Resource
Unit 5: Focus on Grammatical Range & Accuracy

How to answer do you agree or disagree In IELTS?

IELTS speaking is very popular for asking you questions where you have to agree or disagree upon an opinion. Although there is no such rule that best describes the way of answering this IELTS speaking questions, it is always better for you to know some language tips on How to answer do you agree or disagree In IELTS.

In this lesson, you’ll master the Formula for Agreeing and Disagreeing. This is a skill that you will need to use in all Part Three lessons. It is a basic native speaker discussion skill.

When IELTS examiner asks you such question they really have no interest on the content of your answer but construct. They just want to know weather you can use right grammatical structure.

First let’s see some questions under this category


Do you agree that famous people should be used to advertise products on television?
Would you agree that people should have four-day working weeks and three-day
weekends?
Do you agree or disagree that office workers should all wear very formal clothes?
Are you in agreement with the opinion that many young people today care too much
about fashion and not enough about social responsibility?

To agree and disagree you should:-

Answer order
1. Decide what your opinion is about the question the examiner asks.
2. If you only partially agree/disagree, you should.
3. If you totally disagree, you should.

Language steps:

  1. Use agreement expression
  2. Use total and partial disagreement expressions
  3. Use cause and effect logic to support your opinion.

Step 1: How to answer do you agree or disagree, In IELTS?

Use Agreement Expressions

Let’s look at how the IELTS candidate Manjari uses the agreement expressions.
Interviewer: Some people say that one’s university years are the happiest time in life. Would you agree?
Sophia: Yes, I couldn’t agree more!…

Notice how Manjari expresses total agreement with the examiner’s question by saying Yes, I couldn’t agree more! This is a very native speaker way to say that you agree 100% with the other person.

Look at this list of similar agreement expressions:
Yes, I agree wholeheartedly.
I completely agree.
Sure, I too believe that’s true /the case.
Yes, I share the same opinion.

Now, look at these agreement expressions in the context of IELTS Speaking tests. Notice how the student not only expresses his agreement but continues to elaborate on the point and gives reasons to support his agreement:

Interviewer: Well, some people would argue that the best stage in life is after retirement because life is relaxed and predictable. Do you agree?

Yes, 1 totally agree. After a person has retired, they have gone through the challenges of their life and can finally sit back and watch life with a more relaxed attitude.

Step 2: How to answer do you agree or disagree, In IELTS?

Total & Partial Disagreement Expressions


Let’s take a look at how the IELTS candidate Mike uses various total and partial disagreement expression…

Interviewer: Many believe that famous people should not be used in advertisements to sell products. Do you agree?
Mike: No, I can’t agree with that…

Partial Disagreement

If you don’t agree with what the interviewer says, it’s polite to say that you can understand the other person’s opinion but you don’t agree with it.

Look at this list of partial disagreement expressions:
I can see your point, but…
I can see what you’re saying, but…
I agree up to a point, but…
I understand what you’re saying, but I don’t really agree because
OK, but have you considered…
Some may hold that opinion, but I’m afraid I disagree because…

Now look at these partial disagreement expressions in the context of IELTS Speaking tests. Again, notice how the student not only expresses his disagreement, but continues to elaborate on the point and gives reasons to support his disagreement:

Interviewer: Some parents do not accept that their sons and daughters, when in university, go to bars and nightclubs on weekends. Do you agree?
Donald: Ermmm… I can agree to a point, but I do believe that many parents here are too strict and too traditional, Whilst young people should respect their parents to a certain point, parents should also understand that life is different now to when they were young.

Total disagreement

It’s also very useful to be able to express total or strong disagreement when you want to be assertive without, however, sounding rude. When you do this, it’s even more important to give good reasons why you do not agree.

⟹ Look at these total disagreement expressions:
I absolutely disagree because…
I’m sorry, but I can’t agree with that because…
I can’t possibly agree with that because
I can’t share your opinion on this issue, to be honest, because

Now look at these total disagreement expressions in the context of IELTS Speaking tests. Again, notice how the student not only expresses his disagreement, but continues to elaborate on the point and gives reasons to support his disagreement:

Interviewer: Do you agree that humans should not be allowed to eat animals?
Donald: I can’t possibly agree with that because humans need to eat meat, at least occasionally, to stay healthy. If we don’t eat meat, we don’t grow up so fast or strong and we will frequently be under the weather and suffer from minor complaints like colds and coughs.

Step 2: How to answer do you agree or disagree, In IELTS?

Cause & Effect Logic

As you have noticed in Language Steps 1 and 2, it is vitally important that, whatever your opinion, you support your point with reasons and say why you think that way. Native English speakers often use the logic of cause and effect to support their opinions. This means that you say what will or what would happen under the circumstances being proposed.

For example, we shouldn’t just say The rainforests should all be protected as this is not a very strong argument. It would be much better to say: The rainforests should all be protected because otherwise global warming will get much worse and many animal species will be killed. This is a much more powerful and convincing statement.

Look at a few more examples of cause and effect logic supporting opinions:

cause and opinion
cause and opinion

Extra language point Rhetorical Questions


Let’s see how the IELTS candidate Mike use the rhetorical questions.
Mike: No, I can’t agree with that. I firmly believe that everyone, whether they are famous or not, has the freedom to advertise what they want. Just because Jackie Chan is a celebrity, why should this stop him advertising a deodorant or camera?

Sometimes, native speakers will use a rhetorical question, usually at the end of their statement, to express disagreement. A rhetorical question is a question form, but does not actually require the other person to answer. It is used as a challenge or for persuasive effect when we are disagreeing.

In the model answer extract above, notice how Mike makes his point, then ends with the question. Just because Jackie Chan is a celebrity, why should this stop him advertising a deodorant or a camera? Mike is actually saying: Just because Jackie Chan is a celebrity, it doesn’t mean he should not advertise things.